Sign in or create an account

| Forgot Password?

Heritage- How America Can Avoid a European Future

« Back to Events
This event has passed.
Event:
Heritage- How America Can Avoid a European Future
Start:
February 7, 2013 12:00 pm
End:
February 7, 2013 1:00 pm
Category:
,
Organizer:
Heritage Foundation
Updated:
January 23, 2013
Venue:
Heritage Foundation HQ
Address:
214 Massachusetts Ave, NE, Washington, DC, DC, 20002, United States

“We’re becoming like Europe” captures many Americans’ sense that something has changed in American economic life since the Great Recession’s onset in 2008. An economy once characterized by commitments to economic liberty, rule of law, limited government, and personal responsibility appears to be drifting in a distinctly “European” direction.

Across the Atlantic, Americans see European economies faltering under enormous debt; overburdened welfare states; high taxation; heavily regulated labor markets; aging populations; large numbers of public-sector workers; and governments controlling close to fifty percent of the economy. They also observe a European political class seemingly unable – and, in some cases, unwilling – to implement economic reform.

In Becoming Europe, Samuel Gregg examines economic culture – the values and institutions that inform our economic priorities – to explain how European economic life has drifted in the direction of what Alexis de Tocqueville called “soft despotism.” He reflects on the ways in which similar trends are manifesting themselves in the United States but argues that America is not yet Europe and economic decline need not be its future. The path to recovery lies in the distinctiveness of American economic culture. Yet there are ominous signs that some of the cultural foundations of America’s historically unparalleled economic success are being corroded in ways that are not easily reversible.

Samuel Gregg is Director of Research at the Acton Institute. Among the many books he has authored are On Ordered Liberty (2003), the prize-winning The Commercial Society (2007), and Wilhelm Ropke’s Political Economy (2010). He lectures regularly in America and Europe on topics encompassing political economy, economic culture, and morality and the economy.

 

Please register here.

iCal Import + Google Calendar